** The search engine works best with simple, broad searches. Instead of seaching for "what is the link between education and incarceration", search under "prisons" and see if any of the results contain information about education (which some of them do).

Browse Resources

» By Math Topic
» By Social Justice Issue
» By Resource Type

Complete List

Can't find what you're looking for? Email us - we're happy to help: info@radicalmath.org

--------------------------------------

 

 

Browse Resources by 'poverty'

1. A HAND UP: How State Earned Income Tax Credits Help Working Families Escape Poverty in 2004 (external link)
Abstract: How State Earned Income Tax Credits Help Working Families Escape Poverty
Resource Type: Article



2. Aid to Poor Faces Tighter Security (internal link)
Abstract: This 2003 article begins: "President Bush's budget proposes new eligibility requirements that would make it more difficult for low-income families to obtain a range of government benefits, from tax credits to school lunches."
Resource Type: Article



3. Banking on the Bottom (internal link)
Abstract: A very important article that explores the financial options available to poor people and those living in low-income neighborhoods. It discusses the dual problem that these neighborhoods face with a paucity of banks and an abundance of check cashers and other fringe financial institutions that exploit low income people.
Resource Type: Article



4. Basic Family Budgets Better Reveal the Hardships in America (external link)
Abstract: A basic family budget is the amount required to adequately afford a safe and decent, yet modest, standard of living. These budgets are estimated for six family types—one or two parents with one, two, or three children—in over 400 U.S. communities.
Resource Type: Article



5. Basic Family Budgets: Working Families Incomes Often Fail to Meet Living Expenses Around the U.S. (external link)
Abstract: While poverty thresholds are used to evaluate the extent of serious economic deprivation in our society, family budgets—that is, the income a family needs to secure safe and decent-yet-modest living standards in the community in which it resides—offer a broader measure of economic welfare
Resource Type: Article



6. Being Black, Living in The Red (external link)
Abstract: Being Black, Living in the Red demonstrates that many differences between blacks and whites stem not from race but from economic inequalities that have accumulated over the course of American history. Property ownership--as measured by net worth--reflects this legacy of economic oppression. The racial discrepancy in wealth holdings leads to advantages for whites in the form of better schools, more desirable residences, higher wages, and more opportunities to save, invest, and thereby further their economic advantages.
Resource Type: Book



7. Between Hope and Hard Times in NYC (external link)
Abstract: This report explores the current demographics of poor people in New York City. It contains data on who these individuals and families are, as well as related documentation on education and skills training, economic development, and policies that support low-income workers.
Resource Type: Article



8. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (external link)
Abstract: The Center conducts research and analysis to inform public debates over proposed budget and tax policies and to help ensure that the needs of low-income families and individuals are considered in these debates. They also develop policy options to alleviate poverty, particularly among working families.
Resource Type: Website



9. Child Poverty Among Racial Minorities (internal link)
Abstract: This article examines the effects of changing family structures on child poverty rates. The article finds that child poverty rates declined in the 1990's, and presents some interesting arguments for why this has happened.
Resource Type: Article



10. Choosing the High Road: Businesses that Pay a Living Wage and Prosper (external link)
Abstract: For wealthy Americans, the economic miracle of the ’90s represented a dream-come-true. For tens of millions of others, it represented a dream shattered. It doesn’t have to be this way. This report shows why paying a living wage to all employees is good for business, as well as workers and communities.
Resource Type: Article



11. ColorLines Magazine - Article Archive (external link)
Abstract: ColorLines is the first national, multi-racial magazine devoted to covering the politics and creations of communities of color. This site contains archives to all previously published articles, many of which deal with racial & financial issues.
Resource Type: Website



12. Community Voices Heard - Student Guide (internal link)
Abstract: A semester-long unit about conducting and analyzing community surveys. Students learn about randomization, sampling, and different techniques for data analysis. Can be adapted for any grade, 6 - 12.
Resource Type: Curriculum



13. Community Voices Heard - Teacherss Guide (internal link)
Abstract: A semester-long unit about conducting and analyzing community surveys. Students learn about randomization, sampling, and different techniques for data analysis. Can be adapted for any grade, 6 - 12.
Resource Type: Curriculum



14. Comparing Data on Poverty, Health, and Education in Brooklyn (internal link)
Resource Type: Curriculum



15. Comparing Data on Poverty, Health, and Education in the Bronx (internal link)
Resource Type: Curriculum



16. Credit Matters: Low-Income Asset Building Challenges in a Dual Financial Service System (external link)
Abstract: This paper examines the nexus between the utilization of basic financial services, ownership of a transaction account, the creation and use of credit records, homeownership, and management of mortgage repayment risks.
Resource Type: Article



17. Data on Poverty and Income (external link)
Abstract: Extensive data on poverty and income in the United States from as early as 1955
Resource Type: Website



18. Deciding Who’s Poor (external link)
Abstract: This paper looks at the bad old (but still used) way of counting the poor, and contrast it with some of the new ways that have been proposed.
Resource Type: Article



19. Doubly Divided: The Racial Wealth Gap (external link)
Abstract: African Americans and other minorities hold far less wealth than whites. But why should the wealth gap be so large, greater even than the racial income gap? It turns out that government has played a central role. Throughout U.S. history, countless specific laws, policies, rules, and court decisions have made it more difficult for nonwhites to build wealth, and transferred wealth they did own to whites.
Resource Type: Article



20. Elderly Persons (Age 65 or Older) in Poverty, by Race and Hispanic Origin (external link)
Abstract: Elderly Persons (Age 65 or Older) in Poverty, by Race and Hispanic Origin
Resource Type: Chart



21. Essential Facts About the Victims of Hurricane Katrina (external link)
Abstract: This paper provides essential facts about victims of Hurricane Katrina, highlighting the difficult conditions most victims faced long before the storm even arrived
Resource Type: Article



22. Events that Trigger Poverty Entries and Exits (internal link)
Abstract: This article examines how events - such as changes in household composition, employment status, disability status, and economic conditions - affect poverty entries and exits.
Resource Type: Article



23. Federal Regulation of Credit: The Cause or the Cure for Predatory Lending (external link)
Abstract: This paper looks at how, since the 1980's, developments on the federal level have been a significant – if not the primary – cause for the escalation of the predatory lending problem which is steam rolling through communities across America.
Resource Type: Article



24. Female-Headed Families with Children in Poverty, by Race and Hispanic Origin (external link)
Abstract: Female-Headed Families with Children in Poverty, by Race and Hispanic Origin
Resource Type: Chart



25. Fighting Poverty in New York (external link)
Abstract: Several short editorials on the causes of and solutions to issues of Poverty in NYC
Resource Type: Article



26. Fighting Poverty in Queens (internal link)
Resource Type: Curriculum



27. Financial Literacy Stats (internal link)
Resource Type: Article



28. Fiscal Policy Institute (external link)
Abstract: The Fiscal Policy Institute (FPI) is a nonpartisan research and education organization that focuses on the broad range of tax, budget, economic and related public policy issues that affect the quality of life and the economic well-being of New York State residents. The site contains research, policy papers, data on NY state, and more.
Resource Type: Website



29. Foreign Exchange: Investigating the Economy of Foreign Nations (internal link)
Abstract: In this lesson, students share ideas about the values of foreign currencies relative to the U.S. dollar. They then research the economy of a foreign country and prepare an appropriate budget for one month study abroad. They synthesize their learning by reflecting on what life would be like if they were to live on $100 a week in a foreign country.
Resource Type: Curriculum



30. From Unbanked to Homeowner: Improving the Supply of Financial Services for Low-Income, Low-Asset Customers (external link)
Abstract: At least 10 million American households - disproportionately poor, minority, lower income and young are unbanked. This paper explores five factors that have contributed to narrowing the gap.
Resource Type: Article



31. Getting Ahead: A Survey of Low-Wage Workers (external link)
Abstract: This survey was designed to explore the opinions and experiences of low-wage workers regarding career advancement, opportunities for education and job training, and job search resources, with a focus on awareness of, interest in, and usage of public resources.
Resource Type: Article



32. Global Child Poverty (external link)
Abstract: A PowerPoint Presentation on the status of global child poverty. It looks at things like mortality rates, compares wealthy/poor countries, and discusses various commitments (and failures) that different nations have made to eradicate this problem.
Resource Type: Article



33. Hardships are Widespread Among Families in Poverty (external link)
Abstract: This report summarizes recent government findings on the conditions of people living in poverty
Resource Type: Article



34. Health Insurance Coverage in the US (external link)
Abstract: Overview of Health Insurance Coverage throughout the US based on Current Population Survey data. Includes both written highlights as well as simple charts & graphs.
Resource Type: Table/Chart



35. Higher Minimum Wage Most Helps Low-Earning Households (external link)
Abstract: This article describes the difference it does/would make for low income households when the minimum wage is raised
Resource Type: Article



36. Housing Costs Change List of Top Areas for Poverty (internal link)
Abstract: This article reports on new findings that adjust the poverty line to reflect housing costs, and find that New York, California, and Washington, DC have highest percentage of people living in poverty.
Resource Type: Article



37. How Do Poor People Bank? (internal link)
Abstract: A 2 - 4 day lesson on the banking structures available for poor people. The lesson starts by explaining how traditional banks provide people with interest on savings accounts and then explores how this is flipped on poor people forced to use check cashers, pawn shops, rapid refund loans, etc. Math involved includes percents, interest, compound interest, APR.
Resource Type: Curriculum



38. How The Other Half Still Lives (internal link)
Abstract: Borrowing from the Jacob Riis book, this article reports on the living conditions of poor people in this country and how poverty is still hidden from the public eye and agenda. The author looks at issues including wages, homelessness, housing, and job availability.
Resource Type: Article



39. Hurricane Katrina Resource Maps (external link)
Abstract: These maps were prepared for selected areas in support of Hurricane Katrina relief efforts. They contain data on poverty, race, age, education, and other demographic categories for different counties, cities, and states that were affected by Hurricane Katrina.
Resource Type: Map



40. If you work, then you shouldn’t be poor (external link)
Abstract: A brief editorial that contends people who work should not be poor, but because the Minimum Wage is so low, and because of other policies, many who have jobs are still living far below the poverty line.
Resource Type: Article



41. Impact of Cash and Non-Cash Benefits on Poverty Gap: All Persons (external link)
Abstract: Impact of Cash and Non-Cash Benefits on Poverty Gap: All Persons
Resource Type: Chart



42. Impact of Cash and Non-Cash Benefits on Poverty Gap: Children (external link)
Abstract: Impact of Cash and Non-Cash Benefits on Poverty Gap: Children
Resource Type: Chart



43. Impact of Cash and Non-Cash Benefits on Poverty: All Persons (external link)
Abstract: Impact of Cash and Non-Cash Benefits on Poverty: All Persons
Resource Type: Chart



44. Impact of Cash and Non-Cash Benefits on Poverty: Children (external link)
Abstract: Impact of Cash and Non-Cash Benefits on Poverty: Children
Resource Type: Chart



45. Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the US: 2005 (external link)
Abstract: A comprehensive analysis of recent census data on income, poverty, and health coverage.
Resource Type: Article



46. InfoShare (external link)
Abstract: The Infoshare Community Information Service is a sophisticated tool that lets planners, community activists, teachers, students, researchers, and ordinary citizens view and analyze a vast array of community and regional data. Data currently available for NYC and NY State.
Resource Type: Website



47. Institute for Research on Poverty (external link)
Abstract: RP is a center for interdisciplinary research into the causes and consequences of poverty and social inequality in the United States. The website contains research on welfare, EITC, education, and much more. Focuses heavily on poverty in the Midwest
Resource Type: Website



48. Institute for the Study of Homelessness and Poverty (external link)
Abstract: The Institute is a nonprofit, non-partisan, research and policy organization located at the Weingart Center, in the heart of downtown Los Angeles’ Skid Row. The Institute delivers reliable analysis, data and solutions to institutions and individuals to spark new collaborations and foster new initiatives, policies and programs to better understand and address homelessness and poverty.
Resource Type: Website



49. Land Sharks Circling: The Changing Financial Services System and its Implications for Low-Income Families and Communities (external link)
Abstract: This paper explores various fringe banking services that poor people are often forced to use which stand in their way of building wealth.
Resource Type: Article



50. Let the War on the Poverty Line Commence (external link)
Abstract: The poverty line should categorize families such that those who fall below it cannot adequately meet their basic needs, given what we know about human needs and prevailing living standards.
Resource Type: Article



51. Living Wage Campaign (external link)
Abstract: ACORN's website about campaigns for fight for a living wage… includes a brief history of the national living wage movement, background materials such as ordinance summaries and comparisons, drafting tips, research summaries, talking points, and links to other living wage-related sites.
Resource Type: Website



52. Low Income Hinders College Attendance for Even the Highest Achieving Students (external link)
Abstract: This paper explores the correlation between income/financial status and educational outcome
Resource Type: Article



53. Making the Rent: Rent Burdens and Hardship Among Low income New Yorkers (external link)
Abstract: This report examins the changing rent burdens for low-income New Yorkers and their potential consequences. It contains written analysis as well as graphs, charts, and key-findings.
Resource Type: Article



54. More Hard Times for New York's Working Families (external link)
Abstract: This brief details key statistics on NY's low-income families. It also provides several suggestions for what the city can do to help this group of people, as well as decrease the increasing numbers of poor people.
Resource Type: Article



55. National Center for Children in Poverty (external link)
Abstract: The National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) is the nation’s leading public policy center dedicated to promoting the economic security, health, and well-being of America’s low-income families and children. Using research to inform policy and practice, NCCP seeks to advance family-oriented solutions and the strategic use of public resources at the state and national levels to ensure positive outcomes for the next generation.
Resource Type: Website



56. National Poverty Data from 1959 - 2004 (external link)
Abstract: This document includes data from 1959 - 2004 on Poverty Rates by race, female-headed household, children status, elderly status, geographic location, etc. It also contains data about the Poverty Line, including rates of families by race and Hispanic Origin above/below it, information on the work experience of the poor, and much more.
Resource Type: Chart



57. Neighborhood Economic Development Advocacy Project (external link)
Abstract: NEDAP is a resource and advocacy center that works with community groups to promote financial justice in NYC's low income and of color communities. Website contains maps, editorials, policy and position papers, fact sheets, etc.
Resource Type: Website



58. Nickel and Dimed; On (Not) Getting By in America (external link)
Abstract: With some 12 million women being pushed into the labor market by welfare reform, she decided to do some good old-fashioned journalism and find out just how they were going to survive on the wages of the unskilled--at $6 to $7 an hour, only half of what is considered a living wage. So she did what millions of Americans do, she looked for a job and a place to live, worked that job, and tried to make ends meet.
Resource Type: Book



59. NY State Data Center (external link)
Abstract: Census 2000 contains a wealth of information for New York State and its sub-areas. This section contains data from and information about this census.
Resource Type: Website



60. Once Battered by Poverty, Three Families Find a New Start (internal link)
Abstract: An article about three families in NY, the overlapping events that occurred which sent them into poverty, and their stories of slowly trying to climb back from being poor.
Resource Type: Article



61. Percent of Women Above Poverty (external link)
Abstract: From the Institute for Women's Policy Research comes a series of maps of the United States that visually represent the economic status of women based on 2002 data
Resource Type: Graph



62. Persons Below 50 Percent of the Poverty Line, by Race and Hispanic Origin (external link)
Abstract: Persons Below 50 Percent of the Poverty Line, by Race and Hispanic Origin
Resource Type: Chart



63. Persons in Poverty, by Metropolitan Residence (external link)
Abstract: Persons in Poverty, by Metropolitan Residence
Resource Type: Chart



64. Persons in Poverty, by Race and Hispanic Origin (external link)
Abstract: Persons in Poverty, by Race and Hispanic Origin
Resource Type: Chart



65. Persons in Poverty, by Region (external link)
Abstract: Persons in Poverty, by Region
Resource Type: Chart



66. Persons Under the Age of 18 in Poverty, by Race and Hispanic Origin (external link)
Abstract: Persons Under the Age of 18 in Poverty, by Race and Hispanic Origin
Resource Type: Chart



67. Plight Deepens for Black Men, Studies Warn (internal link)
Abstract: Looking at new scholarly analysis, this article reports that Black men in this country are facing an even more dire situation than is commonly cited by employment and education statistics.
Resource Type: Article



68. Poverty and Race Research Action Council (external link)
Abstract: PRACC's mission is to generate, gather, and disseminate information on the relationship between race and poverty. The website contains original articles, publications for download, links to other sites, and an online copy of their monthly newsletter.
Resource Type: Website



69. Poverty Gap for Primary Families and Unrelated Individuals (external link)
Abstract: Poverty Gap for Primary Families and Unrelated Individuals
Resource Type: Chart



70. Poverty Gap for Related Children Under 18 (external link)
Abstract: Poverty Gap for Related Children Under 18
Resource Type: Chart



71. Poverty in California: Moving Beyond the Federal Measure (external link)
Abstract: This report examines poverty rates in the U.S., and adjusts for housing costs, which end up making NY, Washington DC and California the poorest places in the country. The report also challenges traditional models of measuring poverty.
Resource Type: Article



72. Poverty in the United States, 2001 (external link)
Abstract: The Census Report on Poverty in the US. Includes current and historical data by age, race, worker status and experience, depth of poverty, etc., for different regions across the United States.
Resource Type: Article



73. Poverty of Freedom or Freedom from Poverty (external link)
Abstract: This course seeks to engage students in an intensive interdisciplinary study of freedom, prosperity, and poverty. In line with the objectives of the Freedom Project, this course engages in fair-minded and informed investigations that respect a variety of philosophical, religious, and economic approaches to the topics of freedom, wealth, and poverty.
Resource Type: Syllabus



74. Poverty Status of Workers (external link)
Abstract: Poverty Status of Workers
Resource Type: Chart



75. Poverty Status of Working Families with Children (external link)
Abstract: Poverty Status of Working Families with Children
Resource Type: Chart



76. Poverty Thresholds, US Census Bureau (external link)
Abstract: National Poverty Thresholds by Size of Family and Number of Children between 1985 and 2004
Resource Type: Website



77. Poverty Trends for Families Headed by Working Single Mothers (external link)
Abstract: his analysis focuses on poverty in families headed by single mothers who work. In recent years, large numbers of families headed by single mothers have moved from welfare to work. This report addresses the question whether and to what degree those who work have improved their economic situation.
Resource Type: Article



78. Predatory Tax-Time Loans Strip $324 Million from NY's Poorest Communities: An Analysis of Tax Refund Anticipation Lending in NYC (internal link)
Abstract: This report analyzes Rapid Anticipatory Loan (RAL) data in NY between 2002 - 2005, and examines how these loans, and both the large and small banks and financial institutions throughout the city, siphoned $324 million out of the poorest communities.
Resource Type: Data, Article



79. Queers for Economic Justice (external link)
Abstract: Through community speak-outs and panel discussions, QEJ works to bring issues of queer poverty and economic injustice into the spotlight. The website contains news and information about their work, upcoming workshops and events, and links to services for LGTB and poor people.
Resource Type: Website



80. Radical Math: Statistics Unit, Part 2 (Student Version) (internal link)
Resource Type: Curriculum



81. Radical Math: Statistics Unit, Part 2 (Teachers Version) (internal link)
Resource Type: Curriculum



82. Radical Statistics Group (external link)
Abstract: This British group believes that statistics can be used to support radical campaigns for progressive social change. Statistics should inform, not drive policies. Social problems should not be disguised by technical language. The website and their journal explore many social justice issues.
Resource Type: Website



83. Related Children Below 50 Percent of the Poverty Line, by Race and Hispanic Origin (external link)
Abstract: Related Children Below 50 Percent of the Poverty Line, by Race and Hispanic Origin
Resource Type: Chart



84. Related Children Under the Age of 6 in Poverty, by Race and Hispanic Origin (external link)
Abstract: Related Children Under the Age of 6 in Poverty, by Race and Hispanic Origin
Resource Type: Chart



85. Rural Poverty Research Institute (external link)
Abstract: The Rural Policy Research Institute (RUPRI) conducts policy-relevant research and facilitates public dialogue to assist policymakers in understanding the rural impacts of public policies and programs.
Resource Type: Website



86. Six Strategies for Family Economic Self-Sufficiency (external link)
Abstract: e project provides resources and technical assistance to community-based advocates and states on human resource investment policies to help move families out of poverty. The website contains strategies and proposals and a library of relevant online material and links, and seeks to connect the Family Economic Self-Sufficiency Project to a wide audience
Resource Type: Website



87. Social Explorer: Interactive Map Page (external link)
Abstract: This page contains an incredible mapping program. Start with a map of the U.S. Then pick a larger topic (such as race, income, foreign-born population, education) and then more specific categories (ie. % Hispanic, % Black, % White)… and zoom in on a state, county, or census tract within seconds.
Resource Type: Website



88. Social Justice Contexts for Data-Based Projects in Algebra and Statistics (internal link)
Abstract: This unit contains five projects about poverty, and teaches students to use multiple representations to analyze data. The projects engages students in answering these questions: What is Poverty? Who are the Poor? How is poverty related to school achievement? How has poverty changed? What can be done?
Resource Type: Curriculum



89. State Policies to Assist Working-Poor Families (external link)
Abstract: This report outlines a number of policy options that states could adopt to assist working poor families. The rationale for each option is followed by a brief discussion of key design issues and examples of states that have adopted these policies.
Resource Type: Article



90. State-by-State Number and Percent in Poverty, from the American Community Survey (external link)
Abstract: State-by-State Number and Percent in Poverty, from the American Community Survey
Resource Type: Chart



91. State-by-State Percent in Poverty, by Age, from the American Community Survey (external link)
Abstract: State-by-State Percent in Poverty, by Age, from the American Community Survey
Resource Type: Chart



92. Taking Stock: Housing, Homelessness, and Prisoner Reentry (external link)
Abstract: This report examines how those who have spent time in prison or jail fare in securing safe and affordable housing following their release and discusses housing programming and practice designed to assist them. First, the report discusses what is known about the barriers to housing for those returning from prisons and jails. Then, the report summarizes the proceedings from a one-day forum with experts in housing and corrections policy and practice. Last, the report highlights a number of promising housing programs available to returning prisoners and ex-offenders.
Resource Type: Article



93. Taxes: What In The World Are You Paying For? (internal link)
Abstract: Students will explore this essential question: if taxes pay for publicly benefitial programs, then how are they also a cause of poverty? This lesson covers a brief history of income taxes, explores the difference between regressive and progressive taxation, and the increasing ability for corporations to avoid paying taxes. Students also learn about what portion of their taxes are distributed to each governmental agency (including over 30% for the military). 1 - 2 hours.
Resource Type: Curriculum



94. Teaching Economics as if People Mattered (external link)
Abstract: Field-tested by a team of high school teachers, this innovative economics curriculum looks at the human implications of economic policies. These 21 lesson plans are designed to stimulate dialogue and encourage active student participation in the high school classroom. Also suitable for adult audiences and self study.
Resource Type: Book



95. The Child Poverty Situation (internal link)
Resource Type: Curriculum



96. The Color of Wealth: The Story Behind the Racial Wealth Divide (external link)
Abstract: Why does the median family of color have less than a dime for every white dollar? The Color of Wealth exposes how people of color have been barred from government wealth-building programs benefiting white Americans. This uniquely multicultural economic history covers the asset-building stories of Native Americans, Latinos, African Americans, Asian Americans, and European Americans.
Resource Type: Book



97. The Condition of Education, 2005 - Persistance and Attainment of Students with Pell Grants (external link)
Abstract: A summary of the data on persistance and attainment at college of students who receive Pell Grants. The article also contains a summary of data on how many Pell Grants are given, and how much is spent on this program.
Resource Type: Article



98. The Earned Income Tax Credit: Boosting Employment, Aiding the Working Poor (external link)
Abstract: A summary on the benefits of the Earned Income Tax Credit, including specific data on the impact that it has had for poor Americans
Resource Type: Article



99. The Financial Returns to Low-Income Homeownership (external link)
Abstract: This paper presents focuses on two central questions: what are the most important reasons why so many low income households do not hold a checking or savings account? Second, to what extent do households with bank accounts also participate in the fringe financial sector, and in what ways are unbanked households connected to the mainstream financial sector?
Resource Type: Article



100. The High Cost of Being Poor: Another Perspective on Helping Low-Income Families Get By and Get Ahead (external link)
Abstract: The following pages examines the issue —The High Cost of Being Poor—in greater depth and highlight how states and communities are implementing numerous programs to address the problem.
Resource Type: Article



101. The Human Development Index (external link)
Abstract: Published by the United Nations, this country-by-country index compares many factos including life expectancy, literacy, GDP, education, poverty, and much more.
Resource Type: Data



102. The Lottery and Income Inequality in the States (internal link)
Abstract: This article finds that state lotteries foster income concentration, and that states with lotteries have higher levels of income inequality than those states that don’t have a lottery.
Resource Type: Article



103. The Power and Potential of the EITC in 27 Cities (external link)
Abstract: This study looks at the effect that the EITC has had on different communities throughout the U.S. in terms of helping poor people. It focuses on these different areas as well as different types of jobs, family structures, etc. Also includes great maps of each region.
Resource Type: Article



104. The Reality Behind Debt In America: Findings from a National Household Survey of Credit Debt Among Low and Middle-Income America (external link)
Abstract: This survey of 1,150 individuals represent 41 million people in the U.S. It presents key findings about the debt in this country, including average size, length of time in debt, causes and consequences, and other information sorted by various demographic perameters.
Resource Type: Article



105. The Self Sufficiency Standard for the City of New York 2004 (external link)
Abstract: This report looks at how much an individual, especially women, need to survive in NYC. It also looks at wages needed for self-sufficiency in different boroughs, and for women in different economic and family situations.
Resource Type: Article



106. The State of Working America (external link)
Abstract: "If you want to know what happened to the economic well-being of the average American in the past decade or so, this is the book for you. It should be required reading for Americans of all political persuasions." —Richard Freeman, Harvard University
Resource Type: Book



107. The Unheard Third 2005: Bringing the Voices of Low-Income New Yorkers to the Policy Debate (external link)
Abstract: A great series of graphs and data highlights from a survey of low-income New Yorkers about what their lives are like.
Resource Type: Article



108. The Wealth Inequality Reader (external link)
Abstract: Twenty-five substantive, readable essays explore the hidden vector of wealth inequality: its causes, consequences, and strategies for change. Plus: an illustrated overview offers the latest statistics on wealth inequality in a series of one-page snapshots. The essential reader on wealth inequality, this book is a must-have for both the activist and the scholar.
Resource Type: Book



109. The Working Poor (external link)
Abstract: In The Working Poor, David Shipler examines the lives and societal forces surrounding those Americans who still live in poverty despite working full time. While many are mired in these conditions by their own poor choices, many are forced to this level by events they cannot control. Shipler combines both the larger arena of poverty in America with individual stories of those who will never make it out and those who manage to succeed.
Resource Type: Book



110. Ultimate Field Guide to the U.S. Economy: A Compact and Irreverent Guide to Economic Life in America (external link)
Resource Type: Book



111. Understanding Poverty and Economic Opportunity in the US (internal link)
Resource Type: Article



112. Understanding Predatory Lending: Moving Towards a Common Definition and Workable Solutions (external link)
Abstract: The paper sets forth three potential regulatory and legislative solutions that may address the issue of predatory lending.
Resource Type: Article



113. Unemployment and Joblessness in NY City, 2005 (external link)
Abstract: This article examines the other side of decreasing unemployment in NY - particularly what groups are still struggling and experiencing joblessness and poverty.
Resource Type: Article



114. Unhappy Anniversary: Federal Minimum Wage Remains Unchanged for Eighth Straight Year, Falls to 56-Year Low Relative to the Avera (external link)
Abstract: This paper discusses the problem of the minimum wage staying the same while inflation continues to grow and the implications this has for poor people
Resource Type: Article



115. United for a Fair Economy (external link)
Abstract: UFE raises awareness that concentrated wealth and power undermine the economy, corrupt democracy, deepen the racial divide, and tear communities apart. The website contains reports, fact sheets, cartoons, games, and a library on information on economic and racial inequities in our society.
Resource Type: Website



116. US Census Bureau (external link)
Abstract: The official government website for the US Census. It contains current and historical information on the US Population and current demographic trends, sortable by a variety of perameters including race, age, geographic location, nation or origin, job, economic status, etc.
Resource Type: Website



117. US Census Bureau: Poverty Page (external link)
Abstract: This is the main page for data from the US Census on poverty in the U.S. It contains information about the poverty line, publications on poverty among different demographic groups, maps, data sets, and much more.
Resource Type: Website



118. What's a Youngster to Do? The Education and Labor Market Plight of Youth in High-Poverty Communities (external link)
Abstract: Statistics show that many young adults in economically distressed communities are being left behind in educational systems and in the job market. This article highlights the magnitude of distress in selected communities.
Resource Type: Article



119. Who Are Low-Income Working Families? (external link)
Abstract: Over the past decade, national policy has emphasized the centrality of parental work in strategies to support low-income families. This emphasis is exemplified by the fact that the earned income tax credit (EITC), the nation's largest cash assistance program for low-income families, is available only to those who are working. It is natural to ask, therefore, who working low-income families are and how they are faring. This paper addresses these questions.
Resource Type: Article



120. Who Gets the Child Tax Credit (external link)
Abstract: A 5-page summary of the current statistics on the Child-Tax Credit. It also looks at the economic impact on poor families from this credit.
Resource Type: Article



121. Who's poor? Don't ask the Census Bureau (external link)
Abstract: A critique of the methodology used to measure poverty which argues that in fact many more people are poor than our current method shows
Resource Type: Article



122. Work Experience of Poor Persons (external link)
Abstract: Work Experience of Poor Persons
Resource Type: Chart



123. Working Hard, Falling Short (external link)
Abstract: The Working Poor Families Project examines both the conditions of low-income working families with children and public policies that can help improve their lives. This report builds on that work and takes a broader look at low-income working families across the nation and key facets of an economic and public system that affect their ability to achieve economic security.
Resource Type: Article



124. Working to Make Ends Meet: Understanding the Income and Expenses of America's Low-Income Families (external link)
Abstract: This report clarifies the discussion and debate over what constitutes a low-income working family, documents the size and characteristics of low-income working population, and examines their incomes and expenditures. Using data from the 2002 round of the National Survey of America's Families (NSAF), we find that low-income families (income below twice the federal poverty line) with at least one full-time, full-year worker have incomes that are roughly in line with their basic expenses thanks to their work effort, earned income, and a generous refundable Earned Income Tax Credit; however, low-income families without a full-time, full-year worker do not appear to have enough income to cover their basic expenses.
Resource Type: Article




Copyright © 2007 RadicalMath
  

How-To Guide
The "Guide for Integrating Issues of Social and Economic Justice into Mathematics Classrooms and Curriculum" has been updated. Download.

K. Wayne Yang
2007 Panelist
Assistant Professor of Ethnic Studies
UCSD
Co-Founder
East Oakland Community High School